Genealogy Research Services in Iowa

image.png

The Music Man!

We Iowans are very proud of our own Meredith Wilson, creator of “The Music Man,” long running Broadway musical and award winning movie. 

Professor Harold Hill, The Music Man himself, extolls the secret of his success to his fellow salesmen when he states, “Ya Gotta Know the Territory!” 

I often hire experienced genealogy researchers in other locales. Why? Because they “know the territory!” Local researchers are knowledgeable and familiar with the resources and repositories in their area. Remember too, that only a small percentage of historical records are online – the vast majority are only to be found in the local and regional libraries, archives, courthouses, historical societies and more. 

So if a research trip to the midwest is not in your plans, Ancestor Research Iowa (ARI) can help you find your Iowa ancestors. You may seek a particular document or wish to trace a family or individual who migrated to Iowa. There are many aspects to a person’s life and times and records that document their lives too.  

Every state has its own unique history. Despite our image as a farm state, tall corn and pigs, Iowa’s people are historically diverse, hard working, educated, and political from the start. Here’s a brief timeline through the 1940’s in Iowa…where do your ancestors fit into this history? 

1846:   Iowa becomes a “free state,” (not slave state)
1850’s: First union formed by printers in Davenport and Dubuque
Hungarian refugees establish colony in Decatur County
Iowa School for the Blind opens in Keokuk, 1852
Iowa State Teachers Association formed
State University of Iowa, held its first classes in Iowa City
German immigrants established the Amana Colonies
Federal land granted to railroads
1860’s:  Iowa Agricultural College (ISU) established as land grant school
First session of the Iowa Legislature held in Des Moines
Sawmill industry boomed into the 1880’s, along the Mississippi
Civil War changes lives, Iowa woman forms Soldier’s Aid Society
Railroad Act gave grants to railroad companies, opening many jobs
Homestead Act brought new wave of settlers
Iowan from Keokuk appointed to the US Supreme Court
Iowa Integrates Public Schools; Iowa ratified the 13th amendment
Medical School established, open to men and women
1870-1890’s: Iowa’s wheat crop destroyed by insects over a ten year period
Meat packing plants established; first Creamery in Manchester, Iowa
Nationwide economic depression impacts Iowa too
Electric lights and streetcars and telephones come to Iowa cities
Unions representing miners and other workers grow in Iowa
Gas powered tractor invented in Clayton Co, revolutionizing farm machinery
Antonin Dvorak spent a summer in the Czech settlement of Spillville
Iowa’s first nursing school opened in 1898 at University Hospital
Immigrants from Ireland, Swedes, Norwegians, Holland and England
settle in Iowa.
1900-1920: In 1900, there were over 400 coal mines in Iowa
Carrie Chapman Catt became President of the Nat. Women’s Suffrage
Association. Catt grew up in Charles City and graduated from ISU.
Mason Motor Company designed, produced and sold cars in Des Moines
“Niagra Movement” founded in Iowa, later to become the NAACP
TB Treatment Facility in Oakdale, Iowa
Maytag Company begins manufacturing washing machines in Newton
University of Iowa’s Art Department established
Prohibition Closes Iowa Breweries!
John Deere opens factory in Waterloo
1920-1940’s: Iowa State University launched Iowa’s first radio station in 1919; by the 1920’s most Iowa farm families had telephones
Farm recession hit Iowa, resulting from loss of European markets at end of WWI
Iowan, Herbert Hoover became President of the United States
1929 Stock Market crash
Iowans developed the first computer at ISU
WWII, thousands of Iowans served

This is a very brief look at the events that not only impacted the direction of Iowans lives, but shows too, how Iowans contributed to the building of their state.

If you are interested in the research services offered by Ancestor Research Iowa, learn more on the ARI Research Services page, where you’ll also find a query form. Send a message…I’ll get back to you!

Your comments are most welcome on this post.